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Tuesday, February 26, 2008

Chinese Idiom of the Day IV

Other editions of Chinese Idiom of the Day:
Chinese Idiom of the Day I
Chinese Idiom of the Day II
Chinese Idiom of the Day III
Chinese Idiom of the Day V

If you are using your new TWoNN calendars, you will see that Chinese New Year is this Thursday, February 7. In honor of the occasion, I will be posting a new Chinese idiom every day in the scrolling marquee at the top of the blog until my brain runs out of them (currently, I have 11 lined up). I've done the first one (畫蛇添足) and provided the literal translation (Draw snake, add legs.). I have also provided the meaning (You are being unnecessarily extravagant and spoiling the whole thing in the process.).

Starting tomorrow, I will update this blog entry every day to give you a new idiom and its literal translation. But you have to guess its meaning! (Good luck to the non-Cantonese speakers out there, mwahahahahahahahaa!!!)

P.S. There will be a "click me" link in the marquee that will bring you to this blog entry.

Feb. 26, 27, 28: 食火藥 (Ate dynamite.)
Meaning: Mad as hell. (credit: Man from U.N.C.L.E.)

Feb. 29: 跌左個橙, 執返個桔 (Dropped an orange, but picked up a tangerine.)
Meaning: You got rid of one good thing, but still got something good. (credit: Man from U.N.C.L.E.)

Mar. 1: 你做初一, 我做十五 (You do the 1st, I'll do the 15th.)
Meaning: Tit for tat. (credit: Man from U.N.C.L.E.)

PLEASE NOTE: PLAY ON THE CHINESE IDIOM GAME IS SUSPENDED UNTIL APRIL 16.

28 comments:

Mr. Nonny Nu said...

"ate dynamite"

had a very good meal.

had a very bad meal.

bit the big one/kicked the bucket.

he's a baaaaad muthaf--shutsho mouth!--just talkin' 'bout shaft!

~ ~ ~

Nonny Nu said...

he's a baaaaad muthaf--shutsho mouth!--just talkin' 'bout shaft!
This one is close. Please elaborate.

Mr. Nonny Nu said...

"Please elaborate."

Who's the black private dick

That's a sex machine to all the chicks?

SHAFT!

Ya damn right!


Who is the man that would risk his neck

For his brother man?

SHAFT!

Can you dig it?


Who's the cat that won't cop out

When there's danger all about?

SHAFT!

Right On!


~ ~ ~

a dude so bad he could eat dynamite.

Nonny Nu said...

Oh. Okay, you're off. The person who ate dynamite is not bad (as in good), but something that rhymes with bad.

Mr. Nonny Nu said...

"rhymes with bad"

ad, cad, dad, fad, had, lad, mad, pad, rad, sad, tad...

what the hell kind of hint is that?

matter of fact, i'm tired of your so-called idioms. the only thing i want from china is its women and food. cough 'em up. <---and you get no clues on that idiom.

~ ~ ~

Nonny Nu said...

ad, cad, dad, fad, had, lad, mad, pad, rad, sad, tad...
It's one of these, but now you are disqualified from guess this idiom after you've been so disrespectful to it. Have fun with your Chinese women and food tonight--oh, wait, that would be me and what I bring home with me...

Man from U.N.C.L.E. said...

"rhymes with bad"

ad, cad, dad, fad, had, lad, mad, pad, rad, sad, tad...

what the hell kind of hint is that?


Mr. NN did you think of all those on your own or did you use a rhyming dictionary?

食火藥 (Ate dynamite.)

Means "mad as hell."

Mr. Nonny Nu said...

"Mr. NN did you think of all those on your own or did you use a rhyming dictionary?"

perty good ain't me?

~ ~ ~

Nonny Nu said...

Means "mad as hell."
Very good! Another one goes to Man from U.N.C.L.E. Wasn't this one obvious, though?? You guys act like you've never seen a Yosemite Sam cartoon or something.

Cl. Panic said...

Feb. 29: 跌左個橙, 執返個桔 (Dropped an orange, but picked up a tangerine.)

Well, if you cross-breed them you get an Ortaline. Sounds like Ovaltine, but totally different.

Man from U.N.C.L.E. said...

跌左個橙, 執返個桔 (Dropped an orange, but picked up a tangerine.)

I'm thinking that you got rid of one good thing, but still got something good. For instance, you may leave a decent job, but move on to another decent job.

Nonny Nu said...

you got rid of one good thing, but still got something good
Nice. You are correct!

MonkeyPig said...

I am very suspicious that Man from U.N.C.L.E. is Chinese. I bet you bo jai yuen everyday.

MonkeyPig said...

A bunny rabbit!!! A bunny rabbit for the month of March. I might just do what the current Chinese Idiom says, I'll look at all the other pictures in the TWoNN calendar!!

Nonny Nu said...

Don't do it! You will regret it. You won't have anything to look forward to every month if you do it!

Man from U.N.C.L.E. said...

MonkeyPig said...
I am very suspicious that Man from U.N.C.L.E. is Chinese. I bet you bo jai yuen everyday.


Sorry, MP I'm as gweilo as they come. Someone couldn't get more gweilo than me!

Cl. Panic said...

Wait, so do Chinese people prefer oranges or tangerines?

Cl. Panic said...

And by people, I mean the idiom writers. I don't expect NN to speak for all Chinese people. I have a different co-worker who's designated for that responsibility.

Nonny Nu said...

Chinese idiom writers prefer oranges over tangerines because oranges are bigger.

Man from U.N.C.L.E. said...

I'm withholding my guess until the 15th.

Cl. Panic said...

You do the 1st, I'll do the 15th.

Hmm, Man from U.N.C.L.E.... you gave me an idea; the numebrs refer to days of the month.

So is this like "evey dog has his day" in white-speak?

Otherwise, it's setting someone up for the ides of march. Beware!

Man from U.N.C.L.E. said...

Cl.Panic - I was just following the lead of Monkey Pig who mentioned the illustrious TWoNN Calendar above.

Nonny Nu said...

A bunny rabbit!!! A bunny rabbit for the month of March.
It's not just any old rabbit. That's a picture of me!

So is this like "evey dog has his day" in white-speak?
Nope, 'tis not. The clue is actually in MonkeyPig's comment where she mentions the bunny rabbit. She perceives that I have wronged her. Note her reaction.

But, yes, the 1st and 15th in the idiom does refer to the days of the month.

Man from U.N.C.L.E. said...

你做初一, 我做十五 (You do the 1st, I'll do the 15th.)

Has to do with monthly re-imbursement, getting paid or making payments. You pay for the first of the month, with the promise that I'll pick up the middle of the month, although I have no intention of paying in the middle.

I'm as confusedas the next guy with my answer.

Nonny Nu said...

Man from U.N.C.L.E., you are so close! Except, this is not a case of cooperation between the parties. It's more of a grudge thing.

Man from U.N.C.L.E. said...

你做初一, 我做十五 (You do the 1st, I'll do the 15th.)

If it's a grudge thing how about, "Eff you! I'll take the first before you can and you're stuck with the 15th, a-hole!" ?

Nonny Nu said...

If it's a grudge thing how about, "Eff you! I'll take the first before you can and you're stuck with the 15th, a-hole!" ?
You are so close that I'm going to give it to you. (Not really, only half-give because you're almost completely right.) It means, tit for tat. (No, I'm not getting racy.) You do one thing, and I'll reciprocate in my own way.

Nonny Nu said...

PLEASE NOTE: PLAY ON THE CHINESE IDIOM GAME IS SUSPENDED UNTIL APRIL 16.